Anti-Nutrients – Enemies of Nutrients!


Antinutrients are natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the absorption of nutrients.Nutrition studies focus on those antinutrients commonly found in food sources and beverages.

Some of the Anti-Nutrients Are:

  1. Protease inhibitors are substances that inhibit the actions of trypsin, pepsin and other proteases in the gut, preventing the digestion and subsequent absorption of protein. For example, Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor is found in soybeans.
  2. Lipase inhibitors interfere with enzymes, such as human pancreatic lipase, that catalyze the hydrolysis of some lipids, including fats. For example, the anti-obesity drug orlistat causes a percentage of fat to pass through the digestive tract undigested.
  3. Amylase inhibitors prevent the action of enzymes that break the glycosidic bonds of starches and other complex carbohydrates, preventing the release of simple sugars and absorption by the body. Amylase inhibitors, like lipase inhibitors, have been used as a diet aide and obesity treatment. Amylase inhibitors are present in many types of beans; commercially available amylase inhibitors are extracted from white kidney beans.
  4. Phytic acid has a strong binding affinity to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, and zinc. This results in precipitation, making the minerals unavailable for absorption in the intestines. Phytic acids are common in the hulls of nuts, seeds and grains.
  5. Oxalic acid and oxalates are present in many plants, particularly in members of the spinach family. Oxalates bind to calcium and prevent its absorption in the human body.
  6. Glucosinolates prevent the uptake of iodine, affecting the function of the thyroid and thus are considered goitrogens. They are found in broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Guide to anti-nutrients
Guide to anti-nutrients. Source : Draxe

 

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Everything you need to know about Amino Acids!

You need essential amino acids in your daily diet because your body cannot make them. If you do not get essential amino acids in your diet, proteins break down, resulting in muscle loss and problems with repair. Amino acids, which are building blocks of proteins, can be essential, non-essential or conditional.


Your body needs more than 20 total amino acids to build and repair muscles and tissues. The nine essential amino acids are histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine.

Amino acids in food make up protein. When protein is digested it is once again broken down into specific amino acids, that are then selectively put together for different uses. These new proteins formed in the body are what make up most solid matter in the body: skin, eyes, heart, intestines, bones and, of course, muscle.

That’s why understanding what each of these aminos can do and getting more of them in your diet can be very beneficial to reaching specific goals, such as muscle building. Of course, one mustn’t exaggerate, because a good protein balance is what provides health and stability, without it any of the amino acids can become toxic.

An issue that has been brought up in the case of phenylalanine, but holds true for all amino acids. To counter potential harmful effects, getting enough vitamins and minerals is important because they insure proper conversion of protein to amino and vice versa.

Depending on who you talk to, there are around 20 to 22 standard amino acids. Of those 20-22, 8 to 10 of them are considered essential, which means that you need to get a certain amount of them in your diet to function properly – our bodies cannot synthesize them from other materials, so we only get them from food.

Since aminos are the building blocks of protein, I’m sure you get plenty of all of them, but this article will show you the benefits of supplementing with extra free form amino acids, going in to deep detail of what too much or too little of several of them can do, what they do in the body and how much and when you should use them.

Next to the 8 essential amino acids, there are around 14 non-essential amino acids and a whole host of other metabolites classed as amino acids which are derived from the 8 essential ones. Next to the 8 essential aminos, I will try to discuss a number of them that have made the headlines recently: L-Glutamine, L-Arginine, L-Carnitine, L-Cysteine, and HMB.

Source: Body Building Guide

amino-acids-guide_03a

You need essential amino acids in your daily diet because your body cannot make them. If you do not get essential amino acids in your diet, proteins break down, resulting in muscle loss and problems with repair. Amino acids, which are building blocks of proteins, can be essential, non-essential or conditional. Non-essential and conditional amino acids are made in your system, so you do not need to worry about consuming them each day. Knowing which foods provide all or some of the essential amino acids helps you make sure you body gets adequate amounts. Source: Healthy Eating

 

Whey Protein : All About It

Whey protein is the protein contained in whey, the watery portion of milk that separates from the curds when making cheese.
Find out all about whey protein – pros and cons!


Whey protein is the protein contained in whey, the watery portion of milk that separates from the curds when making cheese.

It is used for improving athletic performance, as a food supplement, as an alternative to milk for people with lactose intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione (GSH) in people with HIV disease.

Is natural form of milk better than the powdered milk?

Whey protein is also used for protein allergy, asthma, high cholesterol, obesity and weight loss, preventing allergies in infants, late-stage cancer, and colon cancer.

How does it work?
Whey protein is a source of protein that might improve the nutrient content of the diet. Whey protein might also have effects on the immune system. (source: WebMD)

Even the bacteria in your gut govern how much you are going to weigh!

chocolate-whey-protein-powder

Whey protein is generally regarded as a safe supplement when used appropriately, but you’ll still want to take steps to make sure that you aren’t getting carried away with it. Overconsumption of protein, when coupled with a low carbohydrate intake, can lead to problems

Side effects May include:

  1. Gain Fats: If you’re using whey protein to build lean muscle you probably don’t want to gain weight in the form of fat. But many times whey protein will come with added sugars and therefore added carbohydrates, and some can contain added fat as well.
  2. Could Form Kidney Stones : Excessive amounts of protein causes kidney stones. While there is no conclusive evidence that it causes them, whey protein doesn’t seem to help prevent them, and can worsen the condition if it’s already present. One way to make sure that you don’t get kidney stones from using whey protein is to get enough fiber in your diet. Adequate amounts of fiber and water will help your body maintain itself and prevent the buildup of deposits that can lead to a kidney stone.
  3. Digestive Trouble: Because it is sourced from dairy, whey protein contains lactose, which could end up giving you digestive problems if you are sensitive to it.
  4. Could Develop Gout: It’s not likely that you’d get gout from drinking protein shakes unless you were already showing signs of it, and unless you consume far more than is recommended. But it is something to be aware of if you have a family history of gout.Along with the protein in whey protein, there is also a large amount of amino acids. If your body can’t process these effectively they’ll build up in your system and cause problems with your liver and other organs designed to filter these substances and put them to use.

Source: Bembu

liver - info