Everything You Need To Know About Taurine!

Take a pass on the “crash and burn” high from caffeine and sugar – and taurine. The ingredients of these drinks, both mysterious and some not too mysterious, are a recipe for disaster. They may “give you wings,” but you’ll soon come tumbling down – and in the long run, crash really hard.

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FICCI Research and Analysis Centre (FRAC), food, beverage and environment testing laboratory has constantly been working on developing test methods of various new and complex parameters that are present in food we eat and drinks we consume. In a recent development, FRAC’s technical team has developed testing facility for analysis of Taurine, am amino compound found in every energy drink that is out there in the market.

Read: What happens when you consume Energy Drinks?

Here is everything you need to know about Taurine

Taurine is an amino sulfonic acid, but it is often referred to as an amino acid, a chemical that is a required building block of protein. Taurine is found in large amounts in the brain, retina, heart, and blood cells called platelets. The best food sources are meat and fish.

Some people take taurine supplements as medicine to treat congestive heart failure (CHF), high blood pressure, liver disease (hepatitis), high cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia), and cystic fibrosis. Other uses include seizure disorders (epilepsy), autism, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), eye problems (disorders of the retina), diabetes, and alcoholism. It is also used to improve mental performance and as an antioxidant. Antioxidants protect cells of the body from damage that results from certain chemical reactions involving oxygen (oxidation). (Source: WebMD)

Read : How aspartame, an artificial sweetner, has become a sweet poison!

Because taurine is utilized by the body during exercise and in times of stress, it’s become a popular ingredient in energy drinks. Taurine shows an anxiolytic effect on the central nervous system, causing a possible reduction of anxiety symptoms associated with caffeine intake. While this may sound beneficial, perhaps its not the best thing to intake when seeking energy for your daily tasks.

Side Effects of Taurine

Since taurine produces high level of anxiety symptoms, over consumption of energy drinks may cause a cardiovascular problem. Studies have implicated energy drinks in illnesses ranging from high blood pressure to strokes and seizures to heart disease. For these reasons it’s been banned in some Scandinavian countries after being linked to the deaths of three consumers. (Source: GlobalHealing)

Did you know you could predict a heart attack?

Take a pass on the “crash and burn” high from caffeine and sugar – and taurine. The ingredients of these drinks, both mysterious and some not too mysterious, are a recipe for disaster. They may “give you wings,” but you’ll soon come tumbling down – and in the long run, crash really hard.

energy drinks card

Anti-Nutrients – Enemies of Nutrients!


Antinutrients are natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the absorption of nutrients.Nutrition studies focus on those antinutrients commonly found in food sources and beverages.

Some of the Anti-Nutrients Are:

  1. Protease inhibitors are substances that inhibit the actions of trypsin, pepsin and other proteases in the gut, preventing the digestion and subsequent absorption of protein. For example, Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor is found in soybeans.
  2. Lipase inhibitors interfere with enzymes, such as human pancreatic lipase, that catalyze the hydrolysis of some lipids, including fats. For example, the anti-obesity drug orlistat causes a percentage of fat to pass through the digestive tract undigested.
  3. Amylase inhibitors prevent the action of enzymes that break the glycosidic bonds of starches and other complex carbohydrates, preventing the release of simple sugars and absorption by the body. Amylase inhibitors, like lipase inhibitors, have been used as a diet aide and obesity treatment. Amylase inhibitors are present in many types of beans; commercially available amylase inhibitors are extracted from white kidney beans.
  4. Phytic acid has a strong binding affinity to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, and zinc. This results in precipitation, making the minerals unavailable for absorption in the intestines. Phytic acids are common in the hulls of nuts, seeds and grains.
  5. Oxalic acid and oxalates are present in many plants, particularly in members of the spinach family. Oxalates bind to calcium and prevent its absorption in the human body.
  6. Glucosinolates prevent the uptake of iodine, affecting the function of the thyroid and thus are considered goitrogens. They are found in broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Guide to anti-nutrients
Guide to anti-nutrients. Source : Draxe