Anti-Dengue Fogging is a False Sense of Security ; Ineffective Measure for 25 Years


A Delhi based green NGO, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) has recently urged the government to focus on more effective measures for combating the largely spread Dengue, as the current measures of Fogging have been ineffective.

According to the NGO, the Anti-Dengue Fogging drives are nothing but a false sense of security among the public, a measure that is used by the Government’s for appeasement by wasting lakhs of litres of Diesel every year. CSE urged the government to focus on systematic preventive measures towards clean environment and sanitation. Its assessment said that 4.5 lakh litre of diesel could be used this year for fogging, which comes to 4,500 litres of diesel per day and is also equivalent to the usage of diesel by 2,000 cars in a day. CSE said that targeting adult mosquitoes offers temporary control and that too in limited settings and under ideal conditions and unless repeated frequently, fogging cannot control the next batch of adults out of the larvae. Thus, a source control is a must, using larvacides, to destroy the larva, and effectively prevent public from Dengue. The WHO guidelines on dengue too “questions” the role of fogging and recognises that fogging has been used by South-East Asian countries for the past 25 years but has not been effective.

“Medical experts suggest that direct inhalation of diesel fumes, combined with insecticides, can exacerbate asthma or bronchitis among those with respiratory ailments.

“Pregnant women, small children and old people are most susceptible to aggravation. Eye specialists also mention that diesel fumes can also cause irritation and itching on skin and eyes. Prolonged exposure could lead to temporary swelling of the corneas,” CSE said.

Source : NDTV

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Junk Food At Schools Under FSSAI Scanner


The food regulatory authority of India, FSSAI has now brought Junk Foods under its scanner, and issued a list of guidelines to all the schools over its website. As per the drafted guidelines, country’s top food regulator is set to restrict consumption and availability of junk food in schools. The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) has issued draft guidelines on availability of wholesome and nutritious food in schools to control junk food consumption among children. (Official PDF Here)

Under the draft guidelines, which were first submitted to the court last year, food high in fat, salt or sugar will not be sold within 50 metres of a school’s premises.(Business Insider)

No Junk Food In Schools Now On

The objective of releasing this document is to provide wholesome, nutritional, hygienic and safe healthy food to the students across the 14 lakh schools in India. The lack of availability of balanced diet, nutritional food, awareness about food safety coupled with lack of physical activity among the school kids is the main central cause of many health related issues among school kids.

Read Also: Baba Makes his own version with Maggi

A healthy lifestyle is cornerstone of good health, physical fitness, energy and reduced risk for disease. It is based on the choices one makes about his or her daily habits. Good nutrition, daily exercise and adequate sleep are the foundations for continuing health lifestyle. A healthy lifestyle includes diet based on balance, variety and moderation coupled with regular physical activity commensurate with one’s age, gender and body constitution. As  per  “Dietary Guidelines  for  Indians,  2011”   by National  Institute  of  Nutrition  (NIN),  a balanced diet is one which provides all nutrients in required amounts and proper proportions. It should provide around 50-60% of total calories from carbohydrates, preferably from complex carbohydrates, about 10-15% from proteins and 20-30% from both visible and invisible fat. In addition, it should provide other non-nutrients such as dietary fibre, antioxidants, which bestow positive health benefits.

Read Also: Why We Crave For McDonald’s Food

Childhood  obesity

Childhood  obesity  is one  of  the  most  serious  public  health challenges  of the  21st  century. Overweight children are likely to become obese adults. As per WHO, about 44% of the diabetes burden and  23%  of  the  CYD  burden  is attributable to  overweight  and  obesity.  Overweight children are more likely than non-overweight children to develop insulin resistance, hyper­ insulinemia, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age, which in turn are associated with a higher chance of premature death and disability”.

Diabetes and pediatric metabolic syndrome

Type  2 diabetes   which  is very  common  in adults  is now  increasingly   being  reported   in children. The  leading  risk factor  for kids  is being  overweight,   often  connected   with an unhealthy  diet  and lack of physical  activity.  According   to a study  done  by  Dr Anoop  Mishra  et alan   post  pubertal Indian  children,   67%  males  with  high  BMI  were  found  to have  insulin  resistance  while  overall prevalence   was  about   22%   in  males   and  36%   in females IS.    As per the Diabetes Atlas 2006 published by the International Diabetes Federation, the number of people with diabetes in India is around 40.9 million and is expected to rise to 69.9 million by 2025 unless urgent preventive steps are taken.

Read Also: How safe is our food?

Guidelines Drafted by FSSAI

  1. Restrict  / Limit  the Availability  of most common High Fat Sugar and Salt (HFSS) Foods in Schools and area within 50 meters.
  2. Develop  a  Canteen   Policy  to  provide   Nutritious,   Wholesome  and  Healthy   Food  in Schools.
  3. Regulate  Promotion  of ‘HFSS  Food’ among School Children.
  4. Food  Safety  and  Standards   Authority  of India  should  consider  reviewing  the Labeling Regulations  to enable disclosure  of all Relevant  Information.
  5. Establish  Stringent  Limits for Unhealthy  Ingredients.
  6. Encourage  Physical Activity by School Children.

Watch: How to protect food and make it last longer?

12000 Standards Set by FSSAI


The Food Safety and Standard Authority of India seem to have got into active mode ever since the media cracked onto the Nestle Maggi row. In a recent development, FSSAI has set 12,000 (twelve thousand) standards for food additives and ingredients.
These standards have been set in line with the global standard for product approval Codex. The setting of these standards are supposed to make product approval process more swift, compared to the old lengthy process.
Before this new development, there were only 375 food standards, and NONE were regarding additives and ingredients.

FSSAI has finalised 12,000 standards for food additives and ingredients in line with global safety standards Codex, in order to do away with lengthy process of product approval.
FSSAI has finalised 12,000 standards for food additives and ingredients in line with global safety standards Codex, in order to do away with lengthy process of product approval.

An article in The Times of India :

“FSSAI has approved 12,000 standards for food additives and ingredients. The Law Ministry is vetting the standards and a notification will be issued soon,” a senior health ministry official said.

FSSAI has stepped up measures to strengthen the quality standards for food products. It is reviewing the existing standards set for caffeine content, metal and toxic contaminants and other residues in the food products. The regulator is also in the process of setting standards for imported food items to ensure safe products are sold in the domestic market.

It is noticeable that FSSAI has been quite active in strengthening the food safety norms in India, trying to set levels at par with International levels, which is in best interest of the consumers. But the question is, why did we have to wait for a controversy as large as Nestle Maggi, for the food safety wing  of our country to ensure safer food?

Global standards for food safety set for revision : Times of India

Countries all over the world have come together to revise international standards for food safety and quality, even as concerns have grown in India in the past two months after the food regulator cracked down on major brands including Maggi, Top Ramen and some products of Tata Starbucks. As many as 185 countries, including India and the European Union, are likely to adopt new food safety and quality standards.


Countries all over the world have come together to revise international standards for food safety and quality, even as concerns have grown in India in the past two months after the food regulator cracked down on major brands including Maggi, Top Ramen and some products of Tata Starbucks. As many as 185 countries, including India and the European Union, are likely to adopt new food safety and quality standards. News

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