PETA ad claims Beer is Better than Milk


“Got beer? It’s official: beer is better for you than milk!”. This is what a billboard sponsored by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has claimed in Madison, Wisconsin, also known as America’s Dairyland. 

Well, we knew about how Vodka is beneficial for health [Watch Video Here] but the benefits of beer were only known to dissolve stones (Did you know about Tonsil Stones?there is something called tonsil stones too!) and reduce bad cholesterol. However, PETA claims the following benefits, quoting sources like American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the Harvard School of Public Health, the American Journal of Epidemiology and the Journal of the American Dietetic Association :  beer aids longevity and strengthens bones, while milk causes obesity, diabetes and cancer.

Read here: How to fight diabetes with simple lifestyle changes?

A donation of $500 was made by PETA to MADD out of goodwill after the “Got Beer?” campaign was stripped off in 2000. The campaign was halted out of respect for MADD, PETA explained. After PETA was accused of promoting beer drinking through their campaigns, the organization stated that other beverages like juices, mineral water and soy milk are also recommended by them, and asked why beer has been over-hyped.

Did you know the benefits of having fresh juice from raw fruits and vegetables?

“Had we used soda instead of beer, there would have been no media interest in the campaign, of course. PETA urges everyone, beer-drinkers included, to drink responsibly. Where milk is concerned, there’s no such thing!,” PETA stated on its website. (Source: Yahoo! News)

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Which food articles must not contain MSG, and Added Flavours?


What are Flavouring substances?

Flavouring agents are key food additives with hundreds of varieties like fruit, nut, seafood, spice blends, vegetables and wine which are natural flavouring agents. Besides natural flavours there are chemical flavours that imitate natural flavours. Some examples of chemical flavouring agents are alcohols that have a bitter and medicinal taste, esters are fruity, ketones and pyrazines provide flavours to caramel, phenolics have a smokey flavour and terpenoids have citrus or pine flavour.

Monosodium Glutamate is one of the substances which adds flavour to food, and that has been among the talks a lot in the food industry off late. (Here is why?).

Read Also: Why Lead is Dangerous?

What FSSAI says

Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Regulations, 2011 have described flavouring agents under the head ‘Flavouring Agents and Related Substances’ in the Regulations.

Flavouring agents include flavour substances, flavour extracts or flavour preparations, which are capable of imparting flavouring properties, namely taste or odour or both to food. Flavouring agents may be of following three types:

  • Natural Flavours and Natural Flavouring substances means flavour preparations and single substance respectively, acceptable for human consumption, obtained exclusively by physical processes from vegetables, for human consumption
  • Nature-Identical Flavouring Substances means substances chemically isolated from aromatic raw materials or obtained synthetically; they are chemically identical to substances present in natural products intended for human consumption, either processed or not.
  • Artificial Flavouring Substances means those substances which have not been identified in natural products intended for human consumption either processed or not.

Watch: How to make your food long last?

List of foods where Monosodium Glutamate is not allowed

  • Milk and Milk Products including Buttermilk, Fermented and renneted milk products (plain) excluding dairy based drink.
  • Pasteurised cream, Sterilised, UHT, whipping or whipped and reduced fat creams.
  • Fats and Oils, Pulses, Oil seeds and grounded/ powdered food grains, Food grains, Sago,
  • Butter and concentrated butter, Margarine, Fat Spread
  • Fresh fruit, Surface treated fruit, Peeled or cut fruit.
  • Fresh vegetables, Frozen vegetables.
  • Pastas and noodles (only dried products).
  • Fresh meat, poultry and game, whole pieces or cuts or comminuted. Fresh fish and fish products, including molluscs, crustaceans and echinoderms. Processed fish and fish products, including molluscs, crustaceans and echinoderms.
  • Fresh eggs, Liquid egg products, Frozen egg products.
  • White and semi-white sugar (sucrose and saccharose, fructose, glucose (dextrose), xylose, sugar solutions and syrups, also (partially) inverted sugars, including molasses, treacle and sugar toppings. Other sugars and syrups (e.g. brown sugar and maple syrup),
  • Honey, Saccharine
  • Salt, Herbs, spices and condiments, seasoning (including salt substitutes) except seasoning for Noodles and Pastas, meat tenderizers, onion salt, garlic salt, oriental seasoning mix, topping to sprinkle on rice, fermented soya bean paste, Yeast.
  • Infant food and Infant milk substitute including infant formulae and follow-on formulate, Foods for young children (weaning foods).
  • Natural Minerals water and Packaged Drinking water, Carbonated Water
  • Concentrates (liquid and solid) for fruit juices.
  • Canned or bottled (pasteurised) fruit nectar.
  • Coffee and coffee substitutes, tea, herbal infusions, and other cereal beverages excluding cocoa.
  • Wines, Alcoholic Beverage
  • Fruits and Vegetables products except those where Monosodium Glutamate is permitted under these Regulations.
  • Baking Powder, Arrowroot
  • Plantation Sugar, Jaggery and Bura,
  • Ice-Candies, Ice cream and Frozen desserts.
  • Cocoa Butter
  • Malted Milk Food and Milk based foods
  • Bread
  • Vinegar
  • Sugar Confectionery, Toffee, Lozenges, Chocolate
  • Pan Masala

Restriction on use of flavouring agents the flavouring agents named below are not permitted for use in any article of food

  • Coumarin and dihydrocoumarin;
  • Tonkabean (Dipteryl adorat);
  • β-asarone and cinamyl anthracilate.
  • Estragole
  • Ethyl Methyl Ketone
  • Ethyl-3-Phenylglycidate
  • Eugenyl methyl ether
  • Methyl β napthyl Ketone
  • Propylanisole
  • Saffrole and Isosaffrole
  • Thujone and Isothujone α & β thujone

(source: Food Safety Helpline)