Why is Calcium required in our body?

Consuming too much calcium, especially in the form of calcium supplements, can lead to constipation and kidney stones.

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In the context of nutrition, a mineral is a chemical element required as an essential nutrient by organisms to perform functions necessary for life.  Most of the minerals in a human diet come from eating plants and animals or from drinking water. As a group, minerals are one of the four groups of essential nutrients, the others of which are vitamins, essential fatty acids, and essential amino acids. The five major minerals in the human body are calcium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and magnesium.

Calcium makes up approximately 2 percent of your total body weight and contributes to many basic body functions, including disease prevention and absorption of other nutrients. Consuming enough calcium — between 1,000 and 1,200 milligrams per day for healthy men and women — is a must for optimal nutrition and health. Calcium is key for the health of your bones and teeth, but it also affects your muscles, hormones, nerve function, and ability to form blood clots.

Calcium in periodic table

Calcium performs a number of basic functions in your body. Your body uses 99 percent of its calcium to keep your bones and teeth strong, thereby supporting skeletal structure and function.

Click here to know more about Taurine intake!

Diseases due to Calcium deficiency

Low blood calcium levels and the lack of calcium may lead to the following low calcium symptoms:

  1. Fainting
  2. Heart failure
  3. Chest pains
  4. Numbness and tingling sensations around the mouth or in the fingers and toes
  5. Muscle cramps, particularly in the back and legs; may progress to muscle spasm ( tetany)
  6. Wheezing
  7. Difficulty swallowing
  8. Voice changes due to spasm of the larynx
  9. Irritability, impaired intellectual capacity, depression, anxiety, and personality changes
  10. Fatigue
  11. Seizures
  12. Coarse hair
  13. Brittle nails
  14. Psoriasis
  15. Dry skin
  16. Chronic itching
  17. Tooth decay
  18. Numbness or tingling in the extremities
  19. Muscle weakness
  20. Cataracts
  21. Osteoporosis symptoms (a backache; a gradual loss of height and an accompanying stooped posture; fractures of the spine, wrist, or hip)

What happens if you consume too much Calcium?

Consuming too much calcium, especially in the form of calcium supplements, can lead to constipation and kidney stones. The Institute of Medicine recommends healthy men and women limit their daily calcium consumption to 2,000 to 2,500 milligrams. Taking too much calcium may also lead to side effects such as dry mouth, a continuing headache, increased thirst, irritability, loss of appetite, depression, a metallic taste in the mouth, and fatigue.

Find out how much Calcium is present in your food product today! Call +91-7042492166 or mail to us at info@fraclabs.org to know more about other vitamins and minerals present in food and about their safe limit of consumption.

Pesticides in Fresh Fruits and Vegetables


In a recent development, FICCI Research and Analysis Centre (FRAC Labs)  has purchased an all new latest model of LCMS-MS manufactured by Waters which has enabled FRAC to perform a variety of new tests in-house and provide highly accurate results in a shorter Turn Around Time (TAT).

One such development has been the development of the testing methods of Pesticides in Fresh Fruits and vegetables.

Read Also: Benefits of consuming juice extracted from fresh fruits and vegetables

The technical team at FRAC floated this great news all around, after working hard on new developments and testing facilities :

Read More: More new developments at FRAC. Now Taurine too can be tested at FRAC

Dear All,

Request you to be informed, that analytical method for the quantitative determination of 42 pesticides (in samples of “Fresh Fruits & Vegetables”) by LC-MSMS has been developed by Instrument lab.

The list of parameters that have been developed are as follows:

List of new pesticides that can now be tested by FRAC
List of new pesticides that can now be tested by FRAC

How do restaurants clean the dishes? Difference between cleaning and sanitizing?

Watch this video to learn how eateries clean and sanitise your dishes before you eat on them


What is the difference between cleaning and sanitising of dishes?
Major one being this –

  1. Cleaning means usage of soap
  2. Sanitising involves usage of a chemical and heat.

restaurant20420updated

Learn how dishes are cleaned at eateries, and how safety and hygiene is maintained there from this video:

Watch Here: How to protect your food from contamination?

Crucial points in this segment include: The difference between cleaning and sanitizing, and why it’s important, and washing dishes by hand and using a commercial dishwasher.

Did you know microbiology science has immense effect in our food?

Demand Only Quality


Many congratulations to our readers and followers! FoodQuotient is growing slowly and steadily, and stepping forward with the aim of creating awareness among people about Food, Beverage and Environment, so that our consumers are able to take wise decisions while purchasing and follow a lifestyle that provides a healthy habitat!
Over the past three months, FoodQuotient has been very active over social media platforms – Facebook, Twitter, WordPress and LinkedIN. FoodQuotient is an initiative by FICCI Research and Analysis Centre, that is motivated by a goal of creating well aware consumers. If the buyers are well aware, the manufacturers shall need to ensure only quality products for consumers, and follow hygienic and safe manufacturing processes. FoodQuotient attempts to provide life hacks, video tutorials, quick tips, consultation about not just food and beverages, but even about how to interact with mother nature, to preserve it so as to live in a cleaner habitat!

Here are some of our Tweet Highlights! Follow us on twitter @FRAC_labs
Our Facebook Page can be found at : http://goo.gl/rxIkxn
Read our magazine right here : https://fraclabs.wordpress.com
To know more, visit our website : http://fraclabs.org

Mawa banned in Rajasthan before Diwali


The season of Indian festivities is approaching, with Diwali being the most awaited. Diwali is not just a festival of lights, but also a festival of exchanging gifts and sweets, kaju katli, soan papdi, barfi, gulaab jamun being the most enjoyed Indian sweets. But some notorious makers of these sweets, in order to make more profits, are responsible for the poor health effects on the consumers, by adding adulterants to these sweets.

Also Read: Adulterants in Sweets!

In order to make this Diwali safer, the Rajasthan Government has put a ban on Mawa, one of the most used ingredients in most of the Indian sweets. Rajasthan government has banned mawa and all its products to keep a check on possible adulteration during the coming festive season.

It was informed by chief food safety commissioner B R Meena to the Jaipur High Court, which was hearing a petition seeking court intervention on adulterated mawa in the state. In fact, the problem prevails across the country during festive seasons. According to the notice issued by Rajasthan government, the government had banned mawa on the directions issued by the High Court until further order. The state food safety commissioner told the High Court that the ban would be imposed seriously and subsequently the orders in this regard would be issued to all the relevant local authorities.

Watch: How to protect food and make it last longer?
Read Also: List of Products Banned under FSSAI

The single-judge bench of the High Court called the commissioner to take stock of the situation as to what action and precautions were being taken during Diwali. (source: FnB News)

Which food articles must not contain MSG, and Added Flavours?


What are Flavouring substances?

Flavouring agents are key food additives with hundreds of varieties like fruit, nut, seafood, spice blends, vegetables and wine which are natural flavouring agents. Besides natural flavours there are chemical flavours that imitate natural flavours. Some examples of chemical flavouring agents are alcohols that have a bitter and medicinal taste, esters are fruity, ketones and pyrazines provide flavours to caramel, phenolics have a smokey flavour and terpenoids have citrus or pine flavour.

Monosodium Glutamate is one of the substances which adds flavour to food, and that has been among the talks a lot in the food industry off late. (Here is why?).

Read Also: Why Lead is Dangerous?

What FSSAI says

Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Regulations, 2011 have described flavouring agents under the head ‘Flavouring Agents and Related Substances’ in the Regulations.

Flavouring agents include flavour substances, flavour extracts or flavour preparations, which are capable of imparting flavouring properties, namely taste or odour or both to food. Flavouring agents may be of following three types:

  • Natural Flavours and Natural Flavouring substances means flavour preparations and single substance respectively, acceptable for human consumption, obtained exclusively by physical processes from vegetables, for human consumption
  • Nature-Identical Flavouring Substances means substances chemically isolated from aromatic raw materials or obtained synthetically; they are chemically identical to substances present in natural products intended for human consumption, either processed or not.
  • Artificial Flavouring Substances means those substances which have not been identified in natural products intended for human consumption either processed or not.

Watch: How to make your food long last?

List of foods where Monosodium Glutamate is not allowed

  • Milk and Milk Products including Buttermilk, Fermented and renneted milk products (plain) excluding dairy based drink.
  • Pasteurised cream, Sterilised, UHT, whipping or whipped and reduced fat creams.
  • Fats and Oils, Pulses, Oil seeds and grounded/ powdered food grains, Food grains, Sago,
  • Butter and concentrated butter, Margarine, Fat Spread
  • Fresh fruit, Surface treated fruit, Peeled or cut fruit.
  • Fresh vegetables, Frozen vegetables.
  • Pastas and noodles (only dried products).
  • Fresh meat, poultry and game, whole pieces or cuts or comminuted. Fresh fish and fish products, including molluscs, crustaceans and echinoderms. Processed fish and fish products, including molluscs, crustaceans and echinoderms.
  • Fresh eggs, Liquid egg products, Frozen egg products.
  • White and semi-white sugar (sucrose and saccharose, fructose, glucose (dextrose), xylose, sugar solutions and syrups, also (partially) inverted sugars, including molasses, treacle and sugar toppings. Other sugars and syrups (e.g. brown sugar and maple syrup),
  • Honey, Saccharine
  • Salt, Herbs, spices and condiments, seasoning (including salt substitutes) except seasoning for Noodles and Pastas, meat tenderizers, onion salt, garlic salt, oriental seasoning mix, topping to sprinkle on rice, fermented soya bean paste, Yeast.
  • Infant food and Infant milk substitute including infant formulae and follow-on formulate, Foods for young children (weaning foods).
  • Natural Minerals water and Packaged Drinking water, Carbonated Water
  • Concentrates (liquid and solid) for fruit juices.
  • Canned or bottled (pasteurised) fruit nectar.
  • Coffee and coffee substitutes, tea, herbal infusions, and other cereal beverages excluding cocoa.
  • Wines, Alcoholic Beverage
  • Fruits and Vegetables products except those where Monosodium Glutamate is permitted under these Regulations.
  • Baking Powder, Arrowroot
  • Plantation Sugar, Jaggery and Bura,
  • Ice-Candies, Ice cream and Frozen desserts.
  • Cocoa Butter
  • Malted Milk Food and Milk based foods
  • Bread
  • Vinegar
  • Sugar Confectionery, Toffee, Lozenges, Chocolate
  • Pan Masala

Restriction on use of flavouring agents the flavouring agents named below are not permitted for use in any article of food

  • Coumarin and dihydrocoumarin;
  • Tonkabean (Dipteryl adorat);
  • β-asarone and cinamyl anthracilate.
  • Estragole
  • Ethyl Methyl Ketone
  • Ethyl-3-Phenylglycidate
  • Eugenyl methyl ether
  • Methyl β napthyl Ketone
  • Propylanisole
  • Saffrole and Isosaffrole
  • Thujone and Isothujone α & β thujone

(source: Food Safety Helpline)

Delhi Restaurants: Get licensed, or get Punished!


The Delhi Government is now adopting a “zero tolerance” policy when it comes to maintaining food safety and security for the end consumers. All the restaurants in the national capital will now have to register themselves with the Delhi Government and get a food safety license within ONE MONTH.

No kind of adulteration shall be tolerated by the Delhi Government, said the Delhi Health Minister Satyendar Jain. Another top  Delhi Government official said (source: TOI)

It will now be mandatory for all restaurants and hotels in the national capital to register and get food safety licences within one month, through a simplified online process

READ ALSO:  Adulteration in Sweets

Section 31 (1) the Food Safety and Standards Act clearly states that “No person shall commence or carry on any food business except under a licence.”

The food safety commissioner, Ms.Mrinalini Darswal said, “up to six months imprisonment and Rs.5 lakh fine will be awarded on those running restaurants and hotels without food safety licences.” She said all restaurants and hotels applying for food safety licences will get it through a simplified online process. Applicants can apply online and the department will process their applications and send them their licences on e-mail.

WATCH: How To Protect Food?

Delhi Restaurants

According to the proposed policy, any food vendor, inclusive of roadside eateries, restaurants, hotels and food processors, with a turnover of up to Rs 12 lakh a year has to register themselves with the government. Those with larger turnover will have to obtain a licence from the government. A one-year registration will cost vendors Rs100. The licence, however, is expected to range from Rs 2,000 to Rs 7,500. The government said that the act aimed at ensuring that street food vendors observe better standards of hygiene.

Once the policy is notified, anyone found defaulting will have to either close down the business or shell out heavy penalties ranging from Rs 25,000 to Rs 10 lakh depending upon the gravity of the offence.

FSSAI To Stop Product Approvals


In a publication, dated 26th August 2015, the Food Safety & Standards Authority of India has stated that it is no longer possible for them to continue with the existing Food Product Approval System. The process of product approval has been into action   through their advisory of 11 May 2013. The FSSAI has published this information in view of the Supreme Court Order dated 19 August 2015. The Apex court has upheld the order of Bombay High Court decision on quashing the advisory that FSSAI had issued on the procedure for product approvals. (source : Food Safety Helpline). The process of product approval was brought to allow streamlining of the entire process of approving the food which is not standardized for the safety of the public.

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Food Safety experts say; around the globe product approval is not required to launch products. If FSSAI still feels the need for a product approval system it can only be possible by an Act of Parliament and not through an advisory. However, experts are still awaiting clarifications as right now there is no way to ascertain if food companies are free to launch new products or not. Some experts opine that perhaps new product launches may not be permitted until regulations are in place.