Everything you need to know about Amino Acids!

You need essential amino acids in your daily diet because your body cannot make them. If you do not get essential amino acids in your diet, proteins break down, resulting in muscle loss and problems with repair. Amino acids, which are building blocks of proteins, can be essential, non-essential or conditional.

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Your body needs more than 20 total amino acids to build and repair muscles and tissues. The nine essential amino acids are histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine.

Amino acids in food make up protein. When protein is digested it is once again broken down into specific amino acids, that are then selectively put together for different uses. These new proteins formed in the body are what make up most solid matter in the body: skin, eyes, heart, intestines, bones and, of course, muscle.

That’s why understanding what each of these aminos can do and getting more of them in your diet can be very beneficial to reaching specific goals, such as muscle building. Of course, one mustn’t exaggerate, because a good protein balance is what provides health and stability, without it any of the amino acids can become toxic.

An issue that has been brought up in the case of phenylalanine, but holds true for all amino acids. To counter potential harmful effects, getting enough vitamins and minerals is important because they insure proper conversion of protein to amino and vice versa.

Depending on who you talk to, there are around 20 to 22 standard amino acids. Of those 20-22, 8 to 10 of them are considered essential, which means that you need to get a certain amount of them in your diet to function properly – our bodies cannot synthesize them from other materials, so we only get them from food.

Since aminos are the building blocks of protein, I’m sure you get plenty of all of them, but this article will show you the benefits of supplementing with extra free form amino acids, going in to deep detail of what too much or too little of several of them can do, what they do in the body and how much and when you should use them.

Next to the 8 essential amino acids, there are around 14 non-essential amino acids and a whole host of other metabolites classed as amino acids which are derived from the 8 essential ones. Next to the 8 essential aminos, I will try to discuss a number of them that have made the headlines recently: L-Glutamine, L-Arginine, L-Carnitine, L-Cysteine, and HMB.

Source: Body Building Guide

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You need essential amino acids in your daily diet because your body cannot make them. If you do not get essential amino acids in your diet, proteins break down, resulting in muscle loss and problems with repair. Amino acids, which are building blocks of proteins, can be essential, non-essential or conditional. Non-essential and conditional amino acids are made in your system, so you do not need to worry about consuming them each day. Knowing which foods provide all or some of the essential amino acids helps you make sure you body gets adequate amounts. Source: Healthy Eating

 

5 ways to get relief from backache


Here is a list of 5 things you can do to get relief from backache:

  1. Have some broccoli, spinach and other green leaves: It’s believed that the vitamin K found in broccoli, spinach, and other dark leafy greens, helps calcium deposit in the bones, making them denser. The stronger your bones, the stronger your whole body—and the lower your chances of an injury that could cause back pain.
    And did you know?
    a. Broccoli fight diabetes

    Broccoli Juice
    Broccoli Juice

    b. Broccoli juice boosts health
    c. Broccoli with some lifestyle changes also fights diabetes

  2. Lighten your load: If your purse or briefcase tips the scales at more than 10% of your weight, it’s too heavy. And you need to carry it right. Your best bet is a model with a long strap that lets you position it across your chest like a messenger bag. 
  3. Sleep tight, sleep right!A harder bed may not be better for your back. A recent study in Spine found that people who slept on softer beds reported less lower-back pain than those who snoozed on harder ones.
    Pillows? Yours shouldn’t raise your head out of alignment with your spine. How to tell: If you’re a back sleeper, your chin shouldn’t press into your chest. If you’re a side sleeper, it shouldn’t curve up toward your shoulder.

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    Which sleep posture might be hurting you?
  4. Having abs is also good: Having strong core muscles (we’re talking abs here) can help protect your back from injury. Do this core-strengthening pelvic tilt 2 to 3 times per week: Lie on your back with knees bent, feet flat on the floor, and lower back flattened. Pull in your belly button toward your spine, contracting your abs; your pelvis should lift slightly off the floor.
    Do 2 to 3 sets of 12 reps.
  5. Good posture is importantSitting at a desk for eight (or more) hours a day can really do a number on your back. Make sure to sit with your back against your chair (get a lumbar pillow if you chair doesn’t allow this) and both feet flat on the floor. Another option: Try using a stability ball as your desk chair like many Health staffers do—good posture is a must just to stay on the thing. Start off slow (20 minutes at a time), and if it feels good, stick with it.

 

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Posture to maintain at your workstation