Haldiram Snacks Rejected by US FDA


The US FDA has reportedly rejected multiple snack items coming over from India. The concern was risen soon after the ban on Maggi Noodles from Nestle in India, with concerns over high level of lead and MSG content. The number of food items banned in this period has been highest against food products coming from India.

Read More About: Starbucks and Other Food Items Banned by FSSAIHaldiram Snacks

FDA first found pesticides in Haldiram’s products in September 2014 and has since refused imports of the company’s products 86 times. Among the products rejected have been Haldiram brand cookies, biscuits and wafers. (source: Food Safety News)

During the first five months of this year, FDA reportedly has rejected more snack imports from India than from any other country. The main reasons given were high pesticide levels, mold and Salmonella bacteria.

Read About: Food Contamination and Science of Microbiology in Food
Video: How safe is your food?

Haldiram spokesperson said

“A pesticide that is permitted in India may not be allowed there. And even if it is, they may not allow it in the same concentration as it is here,”

It is time we focussed our food manufacturing standards, and take them to the international levels of quality and safety. After all, our food represents our country, and our quality standards.

Read More: Delhi Restaurants Require License Now

Delhi Restaurants: Get licensed, or get Punished!


The Delhi Government is now adopting a “zero tolerance” policy when it comes to maintaining food safety and security for the end consumers. All the restaurants in the national capital will now have to register themselves with the Delhi Government and get a food safety license within ONE MONTH.

No kind of adulteration shall be tolerated by the Delhi Government, said the Delhi Health Minister Satyendar Jain. Another top  Delhi Government official said (source: TOI)

It will now be mandatory for all restaurants and hotels in the national capital to register and get food safety licences within one month, through a simplified online process

READ ALSO:  Adulteration in Sweets

Section 31 (1) the Food Safety and Standards Act clearly states that “No person shall commence or carry on any food business except under a licence.”

The food safety commissioner, Ms.Mrinalini Darswal said, “up to six months imprisonment and Rs.5 lakh fine will be awarded on those running restaurants and hotels without food safety licences.” She said all restaurants and hotels applying for food safety licences will get it through a simplified online process. Applicants can apply online and the department will process their applications and send them their licences on e-mail.

WATCH: How To Protect Food?

Delhi Restaurants

According to the proposed policy, any food vendor, inclusive of roadside eateries, restaurants, hotels and food processors, with a turnover of up to Rs 12 lakh a year has to register themselves with the government. Those with larger turnover will have to obtain a licence from the government. A one-year registration will cost vendors Rs100. The licence, however, is expected to range from Rs 2,000 to Rs 7,500. The government said that the act aimed at ensuring that street food vendors observe better standards of hygiene.

Once the policy is notified, anyone found defaulting will have to either close down the business or shell out heavy penalties ranging from Rs 25,000 to Rs 10 lakh depending upon the gravity of the offence.

“Ban Alcohol First”


During proceedings on Wednesday, in regard to the ban on the Nestle product, Bombay Highcourt, it was concurred that NO ALCOHOL in India has received any product approval by the food safety regulator. Yet, it is being sold without any ban.

“The first thing that you should ban is alcohol. Nowadays, even schoolchildren have started consuming alcohol. It is injurious to health and is a food product. Cigarette is not because it does not fall in the category of food products,” said Justices V M Kanade and B P Colabawalla after the counsel of food safety regulator — Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) — defended the ban on Maggi noodles saying it was injurious to health.

Technically, alcohols fall under the category of Food Products. However, the same could not be done in the case of cigarettes or any other tobacco products, as they do not fall under the above mentioned category.

The hearing on Wednesday, 22nd July 2015, was to judge whether any action taken by the government, was arbitrary or was it justified. Nestle, obviously standing against the ban said that the ban was imposed merely on the basis of suspicion. Nestle cried foul, as many labs that tested the 2-minute noodles were not even accredited.

However the defence (state) claims that the said that Nestle India was giving an “erroneous impression” by putting a “no MSG (monosodium glutamate)” label on its products. A high content of MSG became the bone of contention over which Maggi noodles was banned on June 5.

According to the Indian Express:

The court also said that it was time to put section 22 of the Food Safety Act to test. The said section deals with all such food items that are banned unless the food regulator approves it. Section 22 of the Act states: “Save as otherwise provided under this Act and regulations made thereunder, no person shall manufacture, distribute, sell or import any novel food, genetically modified articles of food, irradiated food, organic foods, foods for special dietary uses, functional foods, neutraceuticals, health supplements, proprietary foods and such other articles of food which the central government may notify in this behalf.”

–See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/maggi-ban-alcohol-should-be-banned-first-as-it-is-injurious-to-health-says-high-court/#sthash.kvC1R5yb.dpuf

Truth about MSG


Recently, there have been loud whispers about the presence of MSG and Lead in the famous Maggi Noodles, a Nestle product. Many individual labs tested the 2-minute noodle and found it to be carrying MSG and lead in high levels. People seem pretty upset about its presence, but the big question is, what exactly is MSG?
Assocham India has issued an advertisement in a national daily, Times of India, speaking about the Truth about MSG.

1. What does MSG stand for?

Mono Sodium Glutamate

2. What is Glutamate?

Glutamate is a naturally occurring substance in common foods such as milk, vegetables including tomato, corn, onion, green peas, cabbage, spinach, potato, mushroom, wheat flour, cheese and even mother’s milk.

3. What is MSG?

  • A flavour enhancer and one of the many forms of glutamate.
  • Mono sodium glutamate is a permitted additive under India law in many foods.
  • Even if MSG has not been added, a product may show a presence of glutamate due to its natural occurrence in ingredients used in the product. The presence of glutamate in food products is usually interpreted as MSG.
  • MSG is also generally recognised as safe by International bodies such as WHO, UNFAO and USFDA.MSG

4. What do regulations say?

  • If MSG is added to products, manufacturers must declare the same in labels.
  • Manufacturers who do not add MSG to their products used to state “No Added MSG” in their labels, as per industry practice. However, given a recent FSSAI opinion, the industry is taking action to remove this phrase also from the new packagings, and consumers are being notified accordingly.